Preparing for the Holiday Season: A 3-Step Bereavement Guide

October is the last month we have before the crazy holiday rush. As if the approach of the holidays wasn’t stressful enough, this busy time is even more consuming for those who have recently lost a loved one. Taking some time this October to reflect on your grief and how the holidays might impact you is key to not only surviving through the holidays—but finding joy in them as well. The key is to plan ahead and be honest with yourself throughout the planning process. Keep reading to learn more about three simple steps you can take in preparation for the holiday season.

Oct 2018 Bereavement

Realize that the holidays will be different

First, it’s important to understand that the holidays will undoubtedly be different. Sure, the snow may still fall and the radio will still be playing Christmas carols, but after losing a loved one the holidays will never be as they once were. Simply realizing this can help you approach the holidays with a healthier attitude. It is okay to not be okay. It’s okay to be sad or angry. It’s okay to change tradition. Instead of placing pressure on yourself to maintain holiday cheer, be honest with yourself about how your feeling. The holidays will be different no matter what—instead of fighting this, lean into it and discover what you feel most comfortable with during this stage of your grief journey.

Have a (flexible) action plan

Once you’re honest with yourself about how you’re feeling about the holidays, it’s easier to create an action plan. Having a plan in place before the holiday rush begins can help you get organized and better prepare for the stressful season. Making decisions such as who you will be spending the holidays with, whether or not you will be purchasing gifts, baking cookies, etc. beforehand eliminate additional worry later on. Sometimes it’s a good idea to schedule “self-dates” ahead of time as well, providing yourself an easy excuse if attending a certain holiday party is too much to handle. It’s good to plan, but it’s also good to remain flexible as the season unfolds. You may feel better or worse depending on the day or the people you’re with. Just remember—do what you feel most comfortable with.

Celebrate the season and your loved ones

This last step is surely the hardest. For those who are grieving, the holidays are surely a time of remembrance and loss. However, the holidays are also a time of great joy and celebration. As Catholics, Christmas is a time for us to celebrate the birth of Christ and His coming down to Earth so that we may be saved. If you’re still having a hard time finding joy in the season, imagine if you switched roles with your departed loved one. Wouldn’t you want them to be happy during the holidays? Finding joy in the season doesn’t mean you love or miss your loved one any less. Rather, it is an opportunity for you to include them in the eternal celebration of Christ. Making their favorite Christmas cookie, playing their favorite carol, or creating a remembrance ornament are all great ways to include your departed loved ones in the celebration of Christmas. Remember that no matter how dark or desperate your situation seems, there is always hope to be found in Christ our King.

Post written by Katie Karpinski

 

Is It Safe?

Driving down Miles Avenue towards the gates of Calvary Cemetery in Cleveland one can not escape the appearance of a neighborhood in crisis.  It is an inescapable veneer of vacant lots, homes that are dilapidated or boarded up and a number of retail establishments that do not appear inviting to the average customer.  Anyone’s initial reaction would be that the neighborhood is beyond repair, that it has been abandoned and left to the tribulations of the criminals that occupy the underbelly of our society.  “It just isn’t safe” is the comment heard when Calvary Cemetery is the topic of conversation.

Yes, the neighborhood has its problems and it has its criminal element that casts a shadow that cannot be ignored or denied but if you spend some time in the community, you will find a determined majority committed to this community and its resurgence as a vibrant and safe neighborhood.  Look past the veneer of Miles Avenue and you will find a home meticulously maintained and a life beyond the crimes many perceive are occurring on a daily basis just outside the Calvary gates.  Spend some time with the staff at the Union Miles Development Corporation (UMDC) and you will find a group of individuals completely dedicated to this community with vision and optimism.  Attend a meeting at the main office of the UMDC and you will meet some of the neighbors and will soon come to appreciate their desire to live in a community free of the ravages of generational poverty and remove the stains caused by its criminal element.  Calvary is not an island in a sea of crime but one of the anchors for the renewal of the Miles Avenue corridor.  The Diocese of Cleveland through the work of the Catholic Cemeteries Association and the local Catholic churches is a major partner in the resurgence of this community.  Many do not realize that this community has a significant number of amazing Catholic Churches and remains home for a vibrant Catholic community that supports these churches.  I would remind you of the diversity that exists in the universal church and vibrant Catholic community that exists mere moments from the entrance to a sacred place often perceived as unsafe.

The seeds of renewal have been planted in the Union Miles community and they must now be nurtured in order for them to flourish.  One seed was planted by the Catholic Cemeteries Association of the Diocese of Cleveland through its commitment to the revitalization of Calvary Cemetery, Cleveland and the work done to renew this remarkable sacred place.

Passing the iron gates containing sacred symbols of our Catholic faith, a visitor to Calvary will find themselves transported to a place that belies the veneer described above.  Majestic oaks line the perimeter and in the spring the white blossoms on the flowering pear trees remind us of the purity of Christ’s Resurrection.  Our Lady Queen of Heaven guides you on your journey beyond the main entrance and often you will find a visitor reflecting on their relationship with the Blessed Mother.  Often we find bouquets laid at her feet as visitors turn to her for comfort in their time of grief.

The memorials found throughout the cemetery tell a story that is wrapped in the history of Cleveland.  What impresses most is the artistry used to express a families’ love of God in this outdoor garden dedicated to our belief in something beyond description.

Often the statement “it isn’t safe”, is followed with a comment or two such as “I don’t visit anymore because it’s in a bad neighborhood” or “I don’t like going down there because it is so dangerous” and with disbelief in their eyes, the person who uttered those words is told that no one working at Calvary has ever had an incident. While we cannot deny the deterioration that has occurred in the neighborhood surrounding Calvary, we must not deny the beauty that exists within its gates.

To the families that continue to bring their deceased loved ones to Calvary Cemetery for burial in a family plot or simply because they recognize the sacredness of this beautiful cemetery, be assured of our commitment to this sacred place.

Calvary Cemetery is a sacred place that contains an indescribable serenity and reflects a setting that holds deep regard for our responsibility of stewardship and an abiding love for the deceased.  And on some occasions the serenity will be broken by the call of the circling hawk building its nest or the rustle of a herd of deer crossing an open field.  To the critics who object to using land for such purposes I say that the example of Calvary is proof that a cemetery does not waste the land but sets it aside for a sacred purpose.  This Catholic cemetery is for those who desire to remember their ancestors in surroundings not only preserves the sacredness of our earthly dwelling but acknowledges our faith in a heavenly home.

Post written by Andrej Lah

Director of the Catholic Cemeteries Association

Experiencing Grief as a Family

Family dynamics are complex. They are made even more complex when families share the loss of a loved one. Being in such a fragile state, it can be easy to grow frustrated with yourself and each other. While grief will never be an easy journey, there are some things to keep in mind while grieving as a family that can make the journey a little smoother…

Experiencing Grief as a Family

It’s always important to remember that people grieve differently. There are several factors that contribute to how someone grieves, including their age, emotional temperament, and their relationship to the person who passed away. For instance, the way a woman mourns the loss of her spouse is much different than the way a child would mourn for their father. Whereas a spouse may be concerned about how to assume household responsibilities and may mourn the loss of romantic love, a child may be more concerned with the entire idea of death and the loss of parental love. Even those who hold the same role in family, such as two parents who tragically lose a child, may mourn differently due to their personal traits and experiences. It’s important that you remember the fundamental differences that exist from person to person, and be sensitive to these differences. While you may be grieving the same person, this person holds a unique place in each of your hearts.

Another important thing to keep in mind is to avoid comparisons. It’s one thing to support each other by understanding and tolerating differences, but you must also be careful to not benchmark or compare grief experiences. Comparison only leads to more emotional turmoil, and is never healthy. Just remember:

No one grieves in the same way

While one family member may express their grief more physically by crying, other family members may feel more comfortable keeping those feelings reserved. Likewise, some people enjoy being around others while grieving, whereas others prefer to be left alone. There are countless other examples, all of which can vary from person to person.

There is no universal timeline for grief

Family members will work through their grief at their own pace. It all depends on the person and the unique situation.

While members of a family may have completely different grief experiences, there are ways you can help and support each other. Communicating often and openly is always a healthy exercise. Sharing with your family how you’re feeling, and listening to their own thoughts and feelings, can help you sympathize with each other. Another activity family can do together is find time to pray. While everyone may have different experiences, feelings, and personalities everyone has common ground in Christ.

Interested in joining a grief support group? Our groups meet the 3rd Sunday of every month. For more information, please visit https://clecem.org/Information/Bereavement.aspx

Post written by Katie Karpinski

Losing a Loved One to Suicide

Suicide is undoubtedly one of the most devastating tragedies. It knows no limits—happening to even the most faithful of people and families, leaving behind hurt, confused, and mournful family and friends. Losing someone to suicide differs from other losses, and therefore grieving the loss of a loved one to suicide also differs. If you have lost someone to suicide, please take some time to read these words of comfort.

Suicide Blog Twitter

Some questions will go unanswered

Often the first question asked after hearing someone died by suicide is “why?” While we do know some psychological and physiological reasons why people take their own lives, such as loss, failure, or mental illness, the loss of a loved one can still be emotionally confusing. As with any death, confusion is a normal part of the grieving process. However, in the case of suicide this confusion may be more severe. Often when people die by suicide they leave without supplying answers. There are questions that will never be answered, and you must learn to accept this mystery. Instead of focusing on why someone did what they did, focus on mourning in a healthy way.

Anger and bad memories are normal

Feelings of anger are common even in the mildest cases of grief. Following a suicide, however, these feelings of anger and abandonment may be heightened even more. Also, due to the circumstances of a suicide, those grieving may experience the negative memories surrounding the suicide and forget the more positive memories and experiences of the person who passed away. The most important step you can take when experiencing these feelings is too fully experience You must comprehend and accept your negative feelings before moving on to more positive memories.

Invest in yourself and be patient

It’s natural to feel guilty after a friend or loved one dies by suicide. You may feel like you missed a warning sign, or that you could have done something different that would have changed the outcome. It’s important to understand that you were not the only influence on the person’s life, and there are limits to your power and responsibility. Learn to forgive yourself and be patient with the process.

Learn to rely on others

Just as any other cycle of grief, the pain you experience after losing someone to suicide may cause you to put your life on hold. It may force you to change your routines, behaviors, and may just disrupt your life in general. It’s natural to feel flustered by new responsibilities, or even isolated by your grief. One way to help with both of these feelings is by learning to rely on others. Whether it’s a family member or close friend, reaching out to others for help and guidance during your time of need is a healthy and proactive way to work through your grief.

The tragedy of suicide is one that can be prevented in certain cases. If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please know that there is help available. Please call the hotline number listed below, or share how you’re feeling with a trusted family member or friend. You are not alone.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Post written by Katie Karpinski 

Information gathered from Bearing the Special Grief of Suicide by Arnaldo Pangrazzi

My Internship at the Catholic Cemeteries Association: Marketing the Word of God

During my 9 weeks at the Catholic Cemeteries Association I have learned a great deal regarding marketing in terms of data driven decision making, advertising, brand promotion, customer engagement strategies and much more. I have frequently been asked by friends and family what I am doing this summer and I always respond “I am an intern at the Catholic Cemeteries Association.” The first response tends to be, “doing… what?” Which is honestly the first question I asked in my interview with the CCA. I always respond, “I help the marketing team with tasks to help build awareness.”

antonio headshot.jpg
Antonio Vuyancih was selected to participate in the Catholic Community Connection 2018 Summer Fellowship Program. He was placed at the Catholic Cemeteries Association to assist in marketing and outreach activities. 

To start, I have learned more about marketing than I have in any other setting. The CCA has provided for me real tasks which are of high importance to the association. We are a small association, which means every minor detail can have a large impact. The margin for error is low and the opportunity for impact is high. Katie Karpinski is my supervisor and an extremely talented one at that. Katie, only a year older than I has helped spearhead marketing at the CCA and her work here is certainly not going unnoticed. She has provided me with work and responsibilities which I know I will utilize in my future endeavors.

Every day, I am greeted by people such as Rhonda Abrams, our Bereavement coordinator, who is filled with nothing but inspiration, or Chad, one of our Family Service Representatives who interacts with grief-stricken families, parents, and individuals every day, yet always has the energy and light to make them and his colleagues smile. There is also Barb Palumbo, who noted in our initial phone interview that I went to St. Edward High School and her two sons both attended St. Ignatius High School. I laughed and replied jokingly, “Hmm… I’m probably not getting this job, am I?” Barb always finds time in her busy schedule to make her way over to the small corner office I share with Katie to see how I am doing and it is always appreciated. There’s much more I could write about those who work at Calvary Cemetery who consistently amaze me with their diligence and joy. I think it goes without saying, working at a cemetery can be tough. Many opinions of cemeteries are skewed to think that a cemetery is a place of sorrow. However, here at the Catholic Cemeteries Association we know that our cemeteries are a place of faith, hope, and remembrance!

Recently, I have had the pleasure of spending more time around our CEO, Andrej Lah. Andrej is truly an interesting man. He’s serious, direct, and exceptionally inspiring. I can recall a handful of times when Andrej was speaking and I was trying to take notes, but simply set down my pen and notebook and took in all he had to say. His will to speak of tragic stories and still manifest the grace of God in these situations can only be described as captivating. His knowledge of the Catholic faith and the church’s teachings provide him the ability to profoundly express the strength he has in his faith.

When my coworkers walk through the door they do so because of a calling they respond to every morning. I never thought I could enjoy driving into a cemetery every morning and working 8:30AM-4:30PM, but I truly do. Lately, as I awake to my alarm clock early in the day I have felt something that makes me want to clock in at work and give my best effort in building awareness of the Catholic Cemeteries, an extension of the church, to the best of my ability.

I have come to realize in my time at the Catholic Cemeteries Association that the work conducted here is more than helping families find the perfect place to enshrine the memories of their beloved or offer bereavement seminars to help anguished families. The marketing, sales, and IT departments do more than draw attention to or market for the CCA. Every day this team of extraordinary people help each other and the church in building awareness for the WORD of Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior.

“A Prayer For Fishers Of Men”

Father, it is during times of discouragement, bewilderment, or delay that we find ourselves more attentive to godly instruction.  It seems our hearts are more yielded and our minds more absorbing of the truths You want to convey when we’re no longer trying to take charge.  Like the disciples who were fishing in the usual way expecting the usual results we also relate to such efforts.  But You are extraordinary and You do extraordinary work in our lives as we yield our will to Yours and heed Your instruction. Shape us into the most useful and enduring vessel that brings glory to You while we cast our nets for the great catch of men and women, boys and girls for the kingdom.  In Jesus’ name we pray.  Amen.

Prayer by: A Daily Prayer: The daily prayer from Daily Encouragement Net 
Post written by Antonio Vuyancih